Mercedes Congratulates BMW on 100 Years

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Not too sure how many of you know this but automobile giants BMW turned 100 last week. I came across this newspaper cut out just last night while browsing the net. This is an advertisement from Mercedes congratulating BMW for their feat.

Mercedes is a 130 year old company, and been in the industry 30 years longer than BMW.

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The translation from German reads:

“Thank you for 100 years of competition.
The earlier 30 years have been relatively dull.”

I couldn’t agree more. There’s certainly no love lost between the German rivals, but at least they know how to have some fun.

Business isn’t about eliminating your rivals, its about appreciating the work done by your competitors and maintaining healthy competition while striving for excellence.

Brilliant business ethics shown by Mercedes here.

Great job Mercedes and congratulations BMW.

Mercedes Congratulates BMW on 100 Years via Interesting Engineering

 

Dropbox’s Exodus from the Cloud

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Moving to cloud has been the talk of the boardrooms for a long time. Many startups have launched their products using different cloud providers and few have been moving on an off cloud. One example I particularly remember is when when San Francisco based social gaming company Zynga reached its own hyper growth phase, the company moved off of the cloud and into its own data centers. But then its business imploded, and it was left with infrastructure it didn’t really need. It’s now back on Amazon. (Read full story here)

While the companies are busy planning their migrations to cloud, but at the same time we should plan for the moving between the clouds, to avoid vendor lock.

Data migration is a particular problem because a cloud storage service is often seen as the ultimate data archive and the capacities an organization will try to transfer can be very large — petabytes instead of terabytes. Migrating large data sets is always a challenge, but public clouds have the additional issues of limited bandwidth and potential download fees.

Wired magazine recently published the story on Dropbox’s Exodus From the Amazon Cloud, following is an extract:

“Just getting the bits out of Amazon and into other data centers was an epic task. Digitally moving petabytes of data from one machine to another isn’t exactly on the same scale as downloading a few songs for your laptop. Even the fattest Internet pipes only have so much bandwidth.”

Read full story here: The Epic Story of Dropbox’s Exodus From the Amazon Cloud Empire via WIRED

Moving those bytes around is a huge task. Even small and middle size companies will have to face this challenge in due time.

Are you prepared?

 

ECM and Fitness Trackers

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“My new fitness tracker counted 5,000, unfortunately 4,900 of them were to the fridge and back!”

From a fitness perspective wearable products are great at quantifying your activity, but they don’t make you more active, unless you change your habits; you’ll just have an expensive device that tells you how much you don’t do.

On the other hand if you started a regular fitness routine and replace junk food with healthy foods, you would get healthier — with or without the FitBit tracking you.

I can relate this scenario to content management also, need not to say how many times companies will buy the technologies, thinking that it will resolve all of their content management problems. Later realizing that the new fancy toy (technology or tool) has not fixed their content management problems.

This is like blaming the FitBit for not going on my five mile run today.

“Wearable devices have gotten a lot of interest in their potential impact to improve individuals’ health, but there’s been little evidence that these alone can help people sustain changes in behavior,” says author Mitesh S. Patel, MD, a researcher at the University of Pennsylvania. “The more important part is building effective strategies to engage individuals around these devices.”

Technology can give us huge advances, but if enterprises haven’t built a mature content management strategy, pumping money and time into technology is not going to change anything.

Everyone is talking about Documentum

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The news of Dell buying EMC has started a discussion in ECM world about the future of Documentum. But before I jump into this discussion following is the most exciting news I read about EMC-ECD(house of Documentum) has been doing this year:

Earlier this year, EMC announced it is replacing Documentum with a set of cloud-based modular apps that can be consumed at will, and due to be launched by the end of 2015, under its Project Horizon program.

The new platform is not just Documentum in the cloud, it’s an entirely new platform and apps marketplace for content management.

Following are some the blogs where experts have been discussing about it:

The general consensus is to wait and watch as more details about the deal is disclosed.

Analysts noted that Documentum, formerly less than 3% of EMC’s revenue, will be an even smaller portion of the Dell/EMC combined company’s revenue.

After reading all of these blogs, overall Dell+EMC deal looks great and promising and if you are focused exclusively on unstructured content, ECM or information governance the future looks cloudy. But if Dell may want to sell Documentum after buying EMC, I can’t see any real buyer. HP, IBM, SAP, Oracle already have setup their ECM shops.

Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Content Management [21-Oct-2015]

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Gartner Magic Quadrent for ECM 2015Gartner Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Content Management 2015 is out. Gartner did not change the weighting for the major components/core functionalities that an ECM platform should offer.

Vendors Added and Dropped

  • Added: SER Group
  • Dropped: HP, SunGard and Unisys

According to Gartner’s 2015 Magic Quadrant for ECM, the ECM market grew 6.2 percent in 2014 to a worldwide revenue of $5.4 billion.

Here is the link to the report: http://www.gartner.com/technology/reprints.do?id=1-2Q79LWH&ct=151021&st=sb

I will be updating this blog soon with my observations and opinion.

Dell buys EMC…what will happen to Documentum

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Dell has agreed to acquire EMC for LOTS of money, as per the press release, following are the highlights of this deal:

  • Brings together the industry’s leading innovators in digital transformation, software-defined data center, hybrid cloud, converged infrastructure, mobile and security
  • EMC stockholders to receive approximately $33.15 per share (based on the assumptions described below) in a combination of cash as well as tracking stock linked to a portion of EMC’s economic interest in the VMware business
  • VMware to remain an independent, publicly-traded company.

But why it is important for me, I neither own stocks in Dell or EMC nor I work in any of those companies. I care about the future of EMC-ECD (Enterprise Content Division) which is the home of Documentum. If Documentum is vanished, it wouldn’t hurt my job but it will hurt me because Documentum has been a leader in ECM for a very long time and it is the second largest ECM vendor in terms of market share.

Will it be dumped or set-free?
The ECM-ECD (I prefer Documentum) has been on almost on the same place as it was in 2006, since EMC acquired it and it been generating single digit revenue. Also since a large part of this deal is being financed with a new debt, and it has to be paid quickly to provide flexibility to Dell in future. Therefore there are chances that Dell might offload some of the EMC components (e.g. Documentum) to raise more money.

Therefore the question comes for the future of Documentum under Dell leadership, will it be dumped or set free.

Alan Pelz-Sharpe, 451 Research Group analyst, once said, “Documentum wasn’t a good fit within EMC and there doesn’t seem to be a logical fit for them within Dell.”

The ECM-ECG products are valid business applications, but Dell is not a business application company; it provides provides the infrastructure for applications to run on. I think if Documentum were to become independent, then it would have a fresh incentive to fight hard, refresh the product and revive the brand. It’s something that Documentum enthusiasts have been hoping for  a long, long time.