The NextGen Information Professional

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“Skills have become the currency of 21st Century economies.” — Andreas Schleicher, OECD Education Vice President

I remember reading this blog by David Ferriero on how to prepare the next generation of information professionals. In this blog posting, David summarizes a keynote presentation, he gave at Association of Library and Information School Education (ALISE) meeting. He also included a link to the full text of his talk.

In this talk he mentioned the skills following skills for next generation information professionals: the ability to deliver results, to communicate with impact, to influence others, project management.

Here’s my favorite part from his speech:

The ability to demonstrate business savvy. Applying business principles, methods, and processes (e.g., ROI, cost-benefit analysis) to solve problems. Driving business results by planning and prioritizing activities consistent with organizational goals, using data and evaluating the costs, benefits, and impact on others when making business decisions.

The above mentioned blog is three years old, which begs the question what skills are required to be an information professional in 2016?

Following slide share from AIIM outlines what you need to know and the skills you need to learn to become a NextGen InfoPro and remain relevant in information management:

What will it take to be a NextGen InfoPro? | Iron Mountain

 

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ECM and Fitness Trackers

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“My new fitness tracker counted 5,000, unfortunately 4,900 of them were to the fridge and back!”

From a fitness perspective wearable products are great at quantifying your activity, but they don’t make you more active, unless you change your habits; you’ll just have an expensive device that tells you how much you don’t do.

On the other hand if you started a regular fitness routine and replace junk food with healthy foods, you would get healthier — with or without the FitBit tracking you.

I can relate this scenario to content management also, need not to say how many times companies will buy the technologies, thinking that it will resolve all of their content management problems. Later realizing that the new fancy toy (technology or tool) has not fixed their content management problems.

This is like blaming the FitBit for not going on my five mile run today.

“Wearable devices have gotten a lot of interest in their potential impact to improve individuals’ health, but there’s been little evidence that these alone can help people sustain changes in behavior,” says author Mitesh S. Patel, MD, a researcher at the University of Pennsylvania. “The more important part is building effective strategies to engage individuals around these devices.”

Technology can give us huge advances, but if enterprises haven’t built a mature content management strategy, pumping money and time into technology is not going to change anything.

Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Content Management [21-Oct-2015]

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Gartner Magic Quadrent for ECM 2015Gartner Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Content Management 2015 is out. Gartner did not change the weighting for the major components/core functionalities that an ECM platform should offer.

Vendors Added and Dropped

  • Added: SER Group
  • Dropped: HP, SunGard and Unisys

According to Gartner’s 2015 Magic Quadrant for ECM, the ECM market grew 6.2 percent in 2014 to a worldwide revenue of $5.4 billion.

Here is the link to the report: http://www.gartner.com/technology/reprints.do?id=1-2Q79LWH&ct=151021&st=sb

I will be updating this blog soon with my observations and opinion.

Infographic: ECM Insights and Truths

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Infographic_Reveille_ECM-Insights-and-TruthsReveille Software recently released an infographic full of interesting and relevant facts that highlights the need for application management within the ECM environment.

  • Successful ECM programs are increasingly using agile delivery methods.
  • 58% names migration of content from older system as a challenge.

Source: http://reveillesoftware.com/infographic-ecm-insights-and-truths/

Ticket, Ticket, and Tickets everywhere

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According to a recent AIIM survey, ECM teams supporting over 1,000 users are likely to be creating between 60 and 150 support tickets per month. These organizations are likely to have at least 5 full-time equivalent(FTE) support staff dedicated to core content systems, and may have 10 or more.

Of course, many support tickets are generated from user issues related to client problems, connection glitches, or the inevitable password muddles, but as we discussed previously, multi-server, multi-service, enterprise-integrated systems will be susceptible to core problems, and without a good management regime, it can be difficult to pinpoint the causes of speed issues and process hangs.

Effective ECM management includes the procedures, processes and tools to optimize production support cost and time. As ECM adoption increases (and yes, we all want it), there does not need to be a linear increase in support tickets or production support manual tasks. The number of tickets (volume) and time to resolution (TTR) (speed) are important metrics for measuring production support activity and response.

For full survey findings, request the AIIM White Paper.

ECM Definitions from AIIM

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ECM is an umbrella term covering document management, web content management, search, collaboration, records management, digital asset management (DAM), work-flow management, capture and scanning.

ECM is primarily aimed at managing the life-cycle of information from initial publication or creation all the way through archival and eventually disposal.

The Association for Information and Image Management (AIIM) International, the worldwide association for enterprise content management, defined the term Enterprise Content Management in 2000. AIIM has refined the abbreviation ECM several times to reflect the expanding scope and importance of information management.

Following are the few of the ECM definitions which AIIM has released over different period of time.

Late 2005

Enterprise content management is the technologies used to Capture, Manage, Store, Preserve, and Deliver content and documents related to organizational processes.

Early 2006

Enterprise content management is the technologies used to Capture, Manage, Store, Preserve, and Deliver content and documents related to organizational processes. ECM tools and strategies allow the management of an organization’s unstructured information, wherever that information exists.

Early 2008

Enterprise Content Management (ECM) is the strategies, methods and tools used to capture, manage, store, preserve, and deliver content and documents related to organizational processes. ECM tools and strategies allow the management of an organization’s unstructured information, wherever that information exists.

Early 2010

Enterprise Content Management (ECM) is the strategies, methods and tools used to capture, manage, store, preserve, and deliver content and documents related to organizational processes. ECM covers the management of information within the entire scope of an enterprise whether that information is in the form of a paper document, an electronic file, a database print stream, or even an email.

Note: Download the latest research paper from AIIM about the “State of the ECM Industry 2011”
State of the ECM Industry 2011 – How well is it meeting business needs? Mar 21, 2011
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Visit the following page to download the paper: