Internet Debate: Box, Dropbox not a real ECM

Standard

I was very upset to read following tweet from @Contentverse:

The tweet is basically related to this article, again published on Contentverse Blog, which claims that the Box and Dropbox are not document management system. Go ahead and click here and read the article first before proceeding further.

The views expressed in this article are very much anti cloud. Chris Walker (@chris_p_walker) wrote an excellent reply to this post. Click here to read his reply, it’s an interesting read.

ECM being shredded by cloud storage by ThinkstockECM being shredded by cloud storage Credit: Thinkstock [4]

As per a recent article on CIO.com, companies are opting for smaller, more specialized and customized solutions as opposed to bigger, more well-known brands. This is partially the result of digital disruption; business is moving faster than ever and competitors are cropping up where companies least expected them. You need to be able to move quickly and move according to the specs your organization needs, not the specs that an enterprise giant assigns to most of its customers. ECM isn’t dying at all. It’s living a renewed life of specialization and customization.

Is the future of ECM software in the cloud?

SearchContentManagement did a two part series on future of ECM in Cloud, you ca read it here (part 1 and part 2). As per this article it’s clear that despite many challenges, growing adoption suggests that ECM in the cloud has a future, many vendors have already started to offer hybrid model.

 

Advertisements

Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Content Management [21-Oct-2015]

Standard

Gartner Magic Quadrent for ECM 2015Gartner Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Content Management 2015 is out. Gartner did not change the weighting for the major components/core functionalities that an ECM platform should offer.

Vendors Added and Dropped

  • Added: SER Group
  • Dropped: HP, SunGard and Unisys

According to Gartner’s 2015 Magic Quadrant for ECM, the ECM market grew 6.2 percent in 2014 to a worldwide revenue of $5.4 billion.

Here is the link to the report: http://www.gartner.com/technology/reprints.do?id=1-2Q79LWH&ct=151021&st=sb

I will be updating this blog soon with my observations and opinion.

History of OpenText

Standard

The OpenText ECM Suite integrates multiple technologies for document management, records management, web content management, digital asset management, email management and information lifecycle management. Other components include electronic discovery, document capture, document imaging and digital faxing solutions. The suite provides functions for team collaboration, forums, blogs, wikis, and real-time instant messaging and collaboration. These functions are connected through business process management tools to each other and to other business applications and processes.

OpenText originated in 1991 as a small three-person consulting operation. The company was a spin-off of a University of Waterloo project that developed technology used to index the Oxford English Dictionary. In partnership with colleagues from Oxford University, participants in the project included two professors of Computer Science, Dr. Frank Tompa and Dr. Gaston Gonnet, along with their Faculty of Arts colleague, John Stubbs. Later founders of the business application of the technology developed during the course of this project include Tom Jenkins, who joined the company as COO in 1994 and Tim Bray. Tom Jenkins later became President and Chief Executive Officer. Today, John Shackleton serves as CEO of OpenText, and Tom Jenkins as Executive Chairman and Chief Strategy Officer.

Visit the following link to read the complete history of OpenText.