Internet Debate: Box, Dropbox not a real ECM

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I was very upset to read following tweet from @Contentverse:

The tweet is basically related to this article, again published on Contentverse Blog, which claims that the Box and Dropbox are not document management system. Go ahead and click here and read the article first before proceeding further.

The views expressed in this article are very much anti cloud. Chris Walker (@chris_p_walker) wrote an excellent reply to this post. Click here to read his reply, it’s an interesting read.

ECM being shredded by cloud storage by ThinkstockECM being shredded by cloud storage Credit: Thinkstock [4]

As per a recent article on CIO.com, companies are opting for smaller, more specialized and customized solutions as opposed to bigger, more well-known brands. This is partially the result of digital disruption; business is moving faster than ever and competitors are cropping up where companies least expected them. You need to be able to move quickly and move according to the specs your organization needs, not the specs that an enterprise giant assigns to most of its customers. ECM isn’t dying at all. It’s living a renewed life of specialization and customization.

Is the future of ECM software in the cloud?

SearchContentManagement did a two part series on future of ECM in Cloud, you ca read it here (part 1 and part 2). As per this article it’s clear that despite many challenges, growing adoption suggests that ECM in the cloud has a future, many vendors have already started to offer hybrid model.

 

Dropbox’s Exodus from the Cloud

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Moving to cloud has been the talk of the boardrooms for a long time. Many startups have launched their products using different cloud providers and few have been moving on an off cloud. One example I particularly remember is when when San Francisco based social gaming company Zynga reached its own hyper growth phase, the company moved off of the cloud and into its own data centers. But then its business imploded, and it was left with infrastructure it didn’t really need. It’s now back on Amazon. (Read full story here)

While the companies are busy planning their migrations to cloud, but at the same time we should plan for the moving between the clouds, to avoid vendor lock.

Data migration is a particular problem because a cloud storage service is often seen as the ultimate data archive and the capacities an organization will try to transfer can be very large — petabytes instead of terabytes. Migrating large data sets is always a challenge, but public clouds have the additional issues of limited bandwidth and potential download fees.

Wired magazine recently published the story on Dropbox’s Exodus From the Amazon Cloud, following is an extract:

“Just getting the bits out of Amazon and into other data centers was an epic task. Digitally moving petabytes of data from one machine to another isn’t exactly on the same scale as downloading a few songs for your laptop. Even the fattest Internet pipes only have so much bandwidth.”

Read full story here: The Epic Story of Dropbox’s Exodus From the Amazon Cloud Empire via WIRED

Moving those bytes around is a huge task. Even small and middle size companies will have to face this challenge in due time.

Are you prepared?